How to Measure your Spun Yarn

Are you spinning for Spinzilla? Or just spinning for fun?
No matter your spinning goals, there may come a time when you want to find out how much yardage you’ve spun! I’m including a few resources to help you out!

Yarn

Step 1: Skein it Up

Step one of measuring your yarn is usually taking it off of the bobbin and putting it into a skein. A handy tool for doing this is a niddy-noddy. If you’ve never used one before, here’s a little video: https://youtu.be/VqGgqOzVNGg

Step 2: Start Measuring

There are many different ways to measure how much yarn you’ve spun. Here are a few tutorials that I think you’ll find useful… you’ll have to tell me which one is your favorite!

Wow… that’s a lot of options! But just as you discovered your favorite bobbin and plying technique, I’m sure you’ll discover your favorite measuring technique as well!

Let’s get spinning!

Upcoming Events!

Fall is an exciting time in the fiber world! Here is an (incomplete) list of some fiber festivals happening in the US & Canada. If a vendor has confirmed with us that they’ll be carrying Louet product, we’ve listed them!

For the most complete list of fiber events we know of, check out the Knitter’s Review List of Events!

Make a custom gradient yarn

Tutorial: Make a custom Gradient Yarn

I have a little secret to tell you- you can make your own gradient yarn by holding two thicknesses of solids, together!

Here’s the tutorial!

First, gather up the yarns you’d like to compose your gradient. You can go as subtle or as crazy with your line-up of colors as you want!

Rainbow of Louet Gems colors

Here’s the ‘formula’ for making your gradient. Label your colors in order (let’s call them ‘color 1’, ‘color 2’, etc.)

Knit with 2 strands of color 1.
Knit with 1 strand of color 1 and 1 strand of color 2.
Knit with 2 strands of color 2.
Knit with 1 strand of color 2 and 1 strand of color 3.
and so on!

Yup, it’s really that easy!

If you’re a ‘planner’, you’ll want to knit the first section (with the same color doubled) for about 2/3 of the skein of yarn, leaving 1/3 for you to use singly with the next color. This results in color sections of equal length.

Knitting with 2 colors of yarn at once

I find it easiest to do if I’ve wound my yarn into a center-pull ball, and pull 1 strand from the inside and a second strand from the outside. (but there are many ways to work with 2 strands of yarn at once!)

When you’re ready to switch, cut one strand of color 1 (leaving one strand attached), and knit the desired number of rows holding 1 strand of color 1 and one strand of color 2 (you may naturally find yourself finishing color 1):

Knitting with 2 different colors of yarn, held together

And continue!

Make a custom gradient yarn

Isn’t this lovely? Shown in Gems Worsted in Cherry, Petunia, Lilac and Aqua. Knit on a 10.5 needle (working as a bulky yarn)
It’s that easy! And if you have a lot of the same weight of yarn (for example, if you’re a sock knitter and have a lot of fingering weight skeins), this is an amazing stash-busting technique!

Following a Pattern

You can use this technique in any pattern that calls for a solid or gradient yarn! For inspiration, check out this Pinterest board of Rainbow and Ombre items!

How do you calculate the thickness of yarn you’ll need? Check the recommended weight in the pattern. Since you’ll be holding 2 strands of yarn together, so you want to use yarn that is approximately 2 weights smaller than your pattern calls for, that totals twice as much yardage. (For example, 2 strands of lace-weight knit up to about a sport-weight gauge).

Of course, do a gauge swatch with two strands of yarn so that you get the right gauge!

Gradient Flair

The pattern, Gradient Flair by Gwen Bortner uses this technique, and it’s gorgeous! So, if you want to try making your own gradient yarn but want more step-by-step instructions, this skirt could be right for you!

Gwen used Cottolin (which is traditionally a ‘weaving yarn’ because of it’s thinness), but holds 3 strands together and knits it up on a size 6 needle.

And with 70 colors? I bet you’ll find your dream gradient!

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Upcoming Events!

Guest Post: Ombre Batts with Sayra from Atomicblue Fiber

Sayra from Atomicblue Fiber recently shared this fantastic tutorial video featuring her Louet carder. On today’s post, she shares more of her process with our blog readers to inspire fibery fun this winter. If you’re eager to get your hands on a drum carder, now is the perfect time: our StandardClassic & Elite drum carders are 10% off with free freight now through December 31, 2015 only at your nearest Louet Retailer.

Enjoy!



Multifaceted batts are much easier to make with this trick. I was playing in the studio one day, carding some semi felted roving. I carded the colors into layers. Then went to rip it up, thinking I would spin it like that. Instead I carded it again, with the batt sections on their side. Wow, I thought this is really interesting!

The batts are micro striped, with an effortless ombre look. The first time I tried it, was when I pulled the batt into 4 sections. I now separate the batt into 8 sections. It makes it easier to card and control where the fibers go. Here is my step-by-step process demonstrated in the video above:

Step 1: Start with lots of colorful fiber!

Step 2: Add your brights.

Step 3: Remove the Batt.

Step 4: Lay your batt out.

Step 5: Tear apart your batt.

Step 6: Card your batt again!

Step 7: Admire your batt!

Step 8: Spin with your batt!

You could get the same look, by carding a batt four times. Instead, try this carding hack, it’s fun. Consider carding up 10 colors, or just 3 for a tonal look. Mix up the fibers! Try merino,bamboo,and fake cashmere! Add sparkle, or not. It is a fun, very easy technique. The yarns spun from these batts, and subtle and very pretty.

Have fun carding!